• August Academy for Class of 2016 Applicants

    Date & Time:
    From August 5, 2014 to August 7, 2014
    Location:

    CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

    August Academy for Class of 2016 Applicants

    Aug. 5, 6, 7, 2014

    This special series of enrichment classes is open to any prospective student who has commenced the application process for the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism’s Class of 2016. There is no cost to applicants for taking part in the August Academy. Candidates may select up to three courses.

    To Attend August Academy
    ➢ Send a copy of your current resume and a personal statement of up to 1,000 words detailing your interest in Journalism, the reasons why you have decided to attend August Academy, why you are interested in applying to the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, and the elements of your background you feel will enable you to succeed in the program and the profession to Office of Admissions: admissions@journalism.cuny.edu

    ➢  Once the Office of Admissions receives these documents, they will send you the registration link.

    ➢  These documents are due to the Office of Admissions by July 31st.

    SCHEDULE OF CLASSES

    Tuesday, Aug. 5

    9 a.m.-1 p.m.
    News Photography – Jennifer Altman, Room 436
    This workshop led by veteran photojournalist Jennifer Altman will help you improve your photographic skills for use in all media. We will cover the technical and conceptual aspects of basic camera usage, composition, visual vocabulary, photo editing, lighting, and Photoshop. You will also learn how to photograph while recording audio, shooting video, or reporting for print. Whether you are a beginner or intermediate photographer, you will learn the tricks of the trade that professional photojournalists use.

    2-5 p.m.
    Social Media for Journalists – Mitch Trinka, Room 308
    Whether you’re a Twitter newbie or a master Tweeter, here’s your chance to dive in deep. During the first half of this session, we will explore how social media tools – from Twitter and Facebook to LinkedIn and Pinterest – can spark story ideas, reveal trends, and connect you with new sources. In addition to covering social media ethics and etiquette, we will explore best practices and tips, tricks, and tools. During the second half of the workshop, discover how social media can help you build your brand in the new world of Web 3.0. We will explore how leading journalists and news organizations are capitalizing on social networks to reach out to readers, viewers, and communities. Class of 2010 alumnus Mitch Trinka is community manager for the J-School, responsible for its social media presence.

    5-8 p.m.
    Art of the Personal Essay – Paula Derrow, Room 434
    At the heart of every personal essay is a memory—and any memory can be the starting point for a personal essay or a memoir, for that matter. The trick is learning how to access your memories, then using them as a jumping off point for something larger. In this three-hour workshop taught by editor and writing coach Paula Derrow, former articles director and columnist for SELF magazine, we’ll use writing prompts to spur your memory, to warm up your writing muscles, to get you thinking about details, sights, sounds, smells that you may not have thought of in a long time. We will then read each other’s results and discuss the elements that make for a compelling personal essay. Besides in class writing, we will also talk about the basics of pitching personal essays, the difference between personal essay and a blog or diary, and various techniques that make for effective personal writing. (Limit: 15 students.)

    Wednesday, Aug. 6

    10 a.m.-2 p.m.
    Freelancing Workshop – Tim Harper, Adjunct Faculty, Room 308
    We’ll cover generating ideas, understanding markets, getting to the right editor, pitching the story, and contracts and rights issues. Students will also write in-class pitches, to be critiqued on the spot, for magazines and web sites. Longtime independent journalist Tim Harper, a CUNY J-School Craft professor and writing coach, will teach the class. He has written a dozen books, helped many other writers with their books, and written hundreds of articles for markets ranging from Atlantic magazine to airline publications.

    2:30-4 p.m.
    Meet and Greet with Students and Faculty, 3rd Floor Cafe Area

    Thursday, Aug. 7

    10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Food Writing  Annaliese Griffin, Room 434
    Every meal is a story. Whether it’s about the making of the newest culinary creation that has New Yorkers waiting on line, a story about restaurant workers unionizing, or a profile of a farmer who’s changing modern agriculture, food provides endless fodder for enterprising writers. And, in our food obsessed culture, there are more opportunities than ever, from blogs to glossy magazines, to write about it. Annaliese Griffin leads this workshop which will introduce students to the fundamentals of food writing, from identifying story ideas to which adjectives make food editors cringe. Griffin, who is an alumna of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, is the editor-in-chief of Brooklyn Based, a daily email magazine and website covering the best of the best borough. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times dining section, New York Magazine  and Edible Brooklyn and Manhattan.

    2-5 p.m.
    Intro to Radio — Isaac Davy Aronson, Room 436
    You’ve got news to break, information to analyze, a story to tell. So how does it make its way from your head to the radio airwaves, in a form that’s compelling, engaging and comprehensible to a listener? In this workshop-style radio class, we’ll listen to news and feature reports, from short single-voice reports to longer ones with multiple sound elements. We’ll analyze these elements, and walk through the workflow of a radio newsroom. Students will report, write and “broadcast” a story, then craft a web headline and push the story out on social media. Public radio producer, editor, reporter and host Isaac-Davy Aronson will share insights into the various roles that comprise a radio newsroom, how those roles are changing in the digital age, and how innovative public radio programming is disrupting some of the traditional radio news structures.

     

    Last updated Monday, May 26th, 2014 at 12:30 pm