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    January Academy 2014

    Date & Time:
    From January 6, 2014 to January 24, 2014

    Welcome to the January Academy 2014 web page. Please note that this series of enrichment workshops, which will run from Jan. 6-24, 2014, is open to CUNY J-School students, alumni, applicants, select CUNY undergraduates (juniors and seniors only), Macaulay Honors College students, and CUNY J-Camp registrants.

    Registration for Class of 2013 and 2014 students begins Nov. 25, 2012. Students will be emailed a registration link. The costs for the program have been factored into the regular student fees so current students pay nothing extra to sign up.

    Alumni can start registering on Dec. 9, 2012 and must pay a fee of $30 class for up to three classes. Any classes beyond that are free.

    Certain courses will open up to CUNY J-Camp registrants, for various fees depending on the subject, at cunyjcamp.com.

    Applicants and CUNY undergrads must register through the CUNY J-School Office of Admissions. Contact Admissions Director Colleen Marshall at 646-758-7852, colleen.marshall@journalism.cuny.edu.; or Associate Director of Admissions Maximo Patiño at 646-758-7700, maximo.patino@journalism.cuny.edu .

    Please note that current students may sign up for a maximum of 5 courses each initially. At the end of December, students may exceed that limit if there is space left in any course. We reserve the right to cancel any course that does not have a minimum of 8 registrants. Courses that don’t have specified caps on the number of students are limited only by the number of seats in the room.

    THE COURSES

    Monday, Jan. 6, 10-11 a.m. for the orientation meeting
    News Service Internship – Jere Hester – Newsroom
    Pick up some clips in January, working with NYCity News Service Director Jere Hester. Interns will be require to attend a weekly news meeting as well as turn out at least one story a week (at least four pieces). You can bring in stories from the last semester that you’d like to further develop and/or pitch new pieces. Stories can be in any media; one of the things we’ll be working on is how to best package/present pieces. While there will be only one meeting a week, the day and time of which may vary depending on people’s schedules, reporters will be expected to keep in frequent contact with Hester on progress and contribute daily to an ideas wiki.

    Monday, Jan. 6, 10-11 a.m. for the orientation meeting
    The Nabe: Hyperlocal News Internship – Mitch Trinka – Newsroom
    In this class you will learn the basics of hyperlocal blogging by working for The Nabe: Fort Greene and Clinton Hill. We will gather at the J-School or in Brooklyn for editorial meetings and classes covering blogging tools, social media, and hyperlocal reporting. Between other January Academy classes, you’ll report and write stories for The Nabe. Mitch Trinka, a 2010 graduate of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, is collaborative editor of The Nabe and community manager of the CUNY J-School.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Monday, Jan. 6, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Web Security – Prof. Sandeep Junnarkar – Room 436 (20 students max)
    With the ongoing revelations of NSA snooping, we explore ways journalists can try to secure their digital files and communications. The process of fortifying your web and communications defenses is not simple. If a source asks you to take extra measures to protect his or her identity and you don’t already know how, it would take you far too long on the spot to figure it out. Workshop attendees must bring their laptops. Sandeep Junnarkar is head of the interactive journalism program at the CUNY J-School.

    Monday, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 7, 1-5 p.m.
    Freelancing Workshop – Prof. Frederick Kaufman and Ellen Walterscheid – Room 308
    We’ll cover such topics as: generating ideas, understanding the market, getting to the right editor, pitching the story, revising the pitch, understanding the contract, negotiating a good price, working with editors, and polishing the freelance piece. Taught by Prof. Frederick Kaufman, a consortial faculty member at the CUNY J-School and veteran freelancer who has published his essays and articles in Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, Gourmet, Saveur, GQ, New York, Interview, Allure, Spin, Spy, Salon, Vice, Men’s Health, Popular Science, and The New Yorker, among many others; and Ellen Walterscheid (The Sciences, AARP The Magazine, National Geographic World, among others), the J-School’s original career services director. Guests will include a legal expert and top editors from New York Magazine, Vice, and Family Circle, who will critique student pitches. Focus is on the magazine/web market.

    Section 1: Monday, Jan.  6 and Wednesday, Jan. 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
    (Section 2: Friday, Jan. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., with Almudena Toral)
    Making Videos with DSLR Cameras – Samantha Stark – Room 436 (15 students max)
    Many newsrooms around the country are now striving to have videos with very high aesthetic and cinematic qualities. Come learn how to shoot video with DSLR cameras in this one-day crash course. The workshop concentrates on video storytelling for the web, focusing on learning the technical aspects of both the camera (Canon 60D) and the audio (Marantz, microphones) components. You can see Class of 2010 grad Samantha Stark’s work here.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Tuesday, Jan. 7, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Anatomy of a Trial: Covering Legal Cases – Julie Goldscheid – Room 430 (CUNY School of Law)
    Vague about voir dire? Daunted by depositions? Confused about class actions? This class, taught by CUNY School of Law professors Julie Goldscheid and Babe Howell, will explain every element — and every player — in a criminal or civil proceeding. This includes a look at what happens leading up to a trial and a brushup on the structure of the court system (state and federal). You’ll also get an insider’s view on what journalists often get wrong when covering a case — and the right way to approach lawyers and legal documents. Prof. Goldscheid teaches contracts, civil procedure, lawyering, and gender equality, among other subjects. Prof. Howell teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Trial Advocacy and Lawyering Skills at the CUNY School of Law. Her scholarship focuses on the intersection of the criminal justice system and race.

    Section 1: Tuesday, Jan. 7, 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.
    (Section 2: Wednesday, Jan. 8, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. – Jeremy Caplan)
    Better Storytelling with Final Cut Pro X – Bob Sacha – Room 436 (14 students max)
    FCP X is new, sleek and a blessing if you’re new to video. But it’s also a complicated and powerful program that takes practice to master and make your video storytelling life easier. In this half-day workshop, we’ll concentrate on using FCP X in the most effective way to create powerful stories for the web. This advanced class will walk you through FCP X editing and finishing workflows from someone who makes a living editing video for the web. We’ll also cover advanced techniques such as best practices for organizing and cutting material, syncing clips, multi-camera clips, compound clips, color correction and sound mixing. A basic understanding of FCP X is required for this class.

    Tuesday, Jan. 7, Thursday, Jan. 9, Tuesday, January 14 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Documentary Story Structure – Sabrina S. Gordon – Room 434 (15 students max)
    In this class, we will examine the step-by-step process of long-form story telling. We will focus on the use of the narrative three-act storytelling technique and explore different styles, such as cinema verite, investigative, and hybrid genres. We will also compare this to the process of producing short-form news pieces. Students will be assigned documentaries to watch, and they should come to the class with an idea they want to develop into a long-form piece. Motivated students are encouraged to bring in footage, assemblies, or rough cuts to be reviewed in class. Sabrina Schmidt Gordon is an award-winning documentary producer and editor based in NYC.  Her latest film, “DOCUMENTED” – the story of Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas’ life as an undocumented American and his fight for immigration reform – has just been acquired by CNN Films for broadcast in 2014.  Her other credits include producing and editing the acclaimed documentaries, “Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes” and “Mrs. Goundo’s Daughter,” and she is a contributing editor of “The New Black,” a new documentary about marriage equality and the black church, directed by faculty member Yoruba Richen. She co-teaches Video Documentary at the CUNY J-School, and has guest lectured at Brooklyn College, New York University, the Independent Filmmaker Project, and the Jacob Burns Film Center.  She is an advisor to the Yale Visual Law Project and serves on many media panels and juries.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Tuesday, Jan. 7, 1-4 p.m.
    Intro to Data Scraping – Prof. Sandeep Junnarkar – Room 438 (20 students max)
    Automate the capture of information (data, images, URLS, etc) from websites to build your own datasets. This is an introduction to scraping for journalists and requires NO coding, but the basic ability to recognize HTML is helpful. Sandeep Junnarkar is head of the interactive journalism program at the CUNY J-School.

    Section 1: Tuesday, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 8, 2:30-5:30 p.m.
    (Section 2: Tuesday, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 15, 2:30-5:30 p.m.)
    Voice Coaching Workshop – Michael Lysak – Room 330 (15 students max per section)
    The workshop begins with a classroom lecture on the basics of broadcast announcing using audio samples to demonstrate concepts. Topics covered include diaphragmatic breathing, considering the audience, listener distractions, radio versus TV, reporting versus anchoring, differing styles, pacing, and sounding conversational. Practical exercises are taught and demonstrated. The second part of the workshop involves a hands-on voice coaching session in the radio studio. A professional radio newscast is played and analyzed. Students then read newscast scripts. After receiving immediate feedback and critique, students get the opportunity to try again, implementing the skills they have learned. Michael Lysak oversees operations for Bloomberg Radio’s national network and podcasts. Previously, he has been a news anchor and reporter at WCBS, WOR, WNEW and WRKS (Kiss-FM), all in New York City

    Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Jan. 7, 8, 9, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
    Sports Writing and New Media – BJ Schecter – Room 434 (15 students max)
    This hands-on course will cover reporting, writing, interviewing, and packaging of sports news for the web, tablet and mobile apps, social media, newspapers, and magazines. On Day 2, we will attend a college or high school basketball game, which students will cover in the format of their choice. B.J. Schecter is an executive editor at Sports Illustrated and SI.com, where he has worked for more than 16 years as a reporter, writer, and editor. Among his other duties, Schecter is in charge of college sports and manages SI’s investigative team.

    Tuesday, Jan. 7, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
    Smart Photos with Smart Phones – Scott Mlyn – Room 430 (25 students max per session)
    Smart phones have created a new realm of photographic possibility for both professional and citizen journalists alike. Images produced with today’s smart phones now have sufficient quality to be published on all media platforms from digital to print. This course will concentrate on making better pictures with your smart phone. We’ll discuss composition, exposure, moment, as well as conceptualizing and developing an approach. We’ll also examine the use of some popular apps – and the controversial journalistic issues relating to apps. The session will include time for students to make pictures which the instructor will critique. The workshop will be led by Scott Mlyn, a photo editor, photographer, author, teacher and a director of multimedia projects. Currently a photo editor at CNBC, for many years he was deputy picture editor of BusinessWeek magazine. He has taught photography at the International Center of Photography and smart phone photography at the Adorama Photography Workshops.

    Section 1: Wednesday, Jan. 8 and Thursday, Jan. 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    (Section 2: Tuesday, Jan. 21 and Wednesday, Jan. 22, with Almudena Toral)
    Video Storytelling Intensive – Bob Sacha – Room 436 (14 students max)
    Web video is hot: Video accounts for 50% of all Internet traffic and mobile video is set to explode. When you think of how easy it is to watch video on a smart phone or how beautiful video looks on an iPad, it’s no wonder that everyone wants more visual content on their screens. As a multiplatform journalist, it helps your job prospects if you know how to tell a story in more than one medium. This two-day workshop concentrates on video storytelling for the web, focusing on non-narrated stories of compelling characters and short, sharply focused pieces targeted for online viewing. We’ll talk about what type of stories work best for web video, finding strong characters, structuring stories, how to film and conduct an interview for a non-narrated piece, how to capture compelling visual sequences and finally, how to assemble a short video using Final Cut Pro X. The mantra for the class will be “Show, don’t Tell!” This advanced class will be hands on, so you’ll need to be up to speed with FCP X and the JVC HM100U HD video camera. You can see Bob Sacha’s work at www.bobsacha.com.

    Section 1: Wednesday, Jan. 8; Thursday, Jan. 9; Thursday, Jan. 16, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
    (Section 2: Wednesday, Jan. 15, Thursday, Jan. 16, and Thursday, Jan. 23 with James Estrin, 9:30-5:30 p.m.)
    News Photography – James Estrin – Jan. 8 in Room 442; Jan. 9 and 16 in Room 438 (20 students max per section)
    This workshop led by New York Times senior staff photographer and Lens Blog editor James Estrin will help you improve your photographic skills for use in all media. We will cover the technical and conceptual aspects of basic camera usage, composition, visual vocabulary, photo editing, lighting, and Photoshop. The workshop will concentrate on practical tools and problem solving. We will learn how to handle portraits, news conferences, politics, intimate photo essays, and international conflicts. We will also learn how to photograph while recording audio, shooting video,or reporting for print. An afternoon session will concentrate on producing audio slide shows and cross-platform storytelling. Whether you are a beginner or intermediate photographer, you will learn the tricks of the trade that professional photojournalists use. There will be assignments between Days 2 and 3. Students interested in taking the Photojournalism course in the spring are strongly encouraged to sign up for this workshop.

    Wednesday, Jan. 8, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
    Non-Fiction Book Writing – Prof. Glenn Lewis – Room 430 (22 students max)
    Take this one-day crash course on the essentials of conceptualizing, researching, organizing, and writing a professional-level non-fiction book proposal. The seminar also focuses on techniques for reporting and writing non-fiction books. Students are given insights into negotiating book contracts as well. The session draws on Prof. Glenn Lewis’ experiences as a book packager, agent, writer, and book proposal doctor. A guest editor will also participate. Prof. Lewis is director of the journalism program at York College and is a consortial faculty member at the CUNY J-School.

    Wednesday, Jan. 8, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Better Storytelling with Final Cut Pro X – Jeremy Caplan – Room 438 (14 students max)
    FCP X is new, sleek and a blessing if you’re new to video. But it’s also a complicated and powerful program that takes practice to master and make your video storytelling life easier. In this half-day workshop, we’ll concentrate on using FCP X in the most effective way to create powerful stories for the web. This advanced class will walk you through FCP X editing and finishing workflows from someone who makes a living editing video for the web. We’ll also cover advanced techniques such as best practices for organizing and cutting material, syncing clips, multi-camera clips, compound clips, color correction and sound mixing. A basic understanding of FCP X is required for this class.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Wednesday, Jan. 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
    Covering Diversity – Tanzina Vega – Room 308
    Class of ’07 grad Tanzina Vega is developing a new beat at The New York Times exploring America’s diversity and its tension points. She’ll lead a discussion on what it means to cover diversity in a 21st-century context and how journalists can avoid the stereotypes, prejudices, and mistaken assumptions about the multicultural individuals, communities, and issues they report on. Faculty members are invited to add their thoughts about how diversity can be better addressed in the classroom.

    Wednesday, Jan. 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
    Write about Your Life: The Art of Memoir and Personal Essay – Paula Derrow – Room 434 (15 students max)
    At the heart of every personal essay is a memory – and any memory can be the starting point for a personal essay or a memoir. The trick is learning how to access your memories, then using them as a jumping off point for something larger. In this workshop, Paula Derrow, former articles director and Self Expression column editor for SELF magazine, who writes for The New York Times, Cosmo, and Redbook, among others, will use writing prompts to spur your memory, warm up your writing muscles, and get you thinking about details, sights, sounds, smells that you may not have thought of in a long time. We will read each other’s writing and discuss the elements that make for a compelling personal essay. Besides in-class exercises, we will also talk about the basics of pitching personal essays, the difference between personal essay and a blog or diary, and various techniques that make for effective personal writing.

    Thursday, Jan. 9, 1-4 p.m.
    Math for Journalists – Benjamin Lesser – Room 430 (25 students max)
    In this class, you’ll learn how to deal with numbers and statistical concepts that often come up while working on a story. You’ll learn a variety of concepts including simple formulas such as determining percent change and how to adjust for inflation. Understanding these concepts will allow you to produce more accurate, meaningful stories. Ben Lesser has more than a dozen years of municipal and investigative reporting experience at newspapers such as the New York Daily News and The Bergen Record. He was also an adjunct at the CUNY J-School who taught investigative reporting and computer-assisted reporting.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Thursday, Jan. 9, 5-8 p.m.
    Immersion Journalism – Cassie Rodenberg – Room 434 (25 students max)
    If long-form and long-term assignments seem impossible for all but late-career writers, this workshop will show you a new way to make a career out of your dream project. You’ll be shown how to forge your own, unique niche in media, and how to holistically immerse yourself in your passion for an unrivaled depth of coverage.  Workshop participants will craft a step-wise plan to make their project real. Science writer Cassie Rodenberg has jointly produced a long-term series for Scientific American Mind on addiction, poverty and prostitution in Hunts Point, South Bronx, a project that has won international acclaim. See her White Noise column here:http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/white-noise/

    Thursday, Jan. 9, 5:30-7 p.m. and Thursday, Jan. 23, 5:30-7 p.m.
    Self Defense with Sensei George – Jiri Cermak – Room 308
    Join our own Sensei George – aka Jiri Cermak of the Campus Facilities staff – for a self-defense class. Learn how to counter a surprise attack on the street, in the subway, or in a park. The class will include: basic self-defense against wrist, shoulder, or body grabs; self-defense for women; defense against punches or kicks; defense against attack with a gun and knife, and overall street awareness strategy. Wear comfortable clothes and sneakers. Sensei George is a 5th degree Black Belt of Shotokan karate; 2nd degree Black Belt of Jiu-jitsu, and 1st degree Black Belt of Japanese traditional weapons.

    Friday, Jan. 10, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Be Your Own Brand – Toddi Gutner – Room 442 (30 students max)
    Increasingly, today’s young journalists are following new, much more entrepreneurial career paths than their predecessors did. Instead of getting a job at a single media organization, these “indies” are going out into the world with their backpacks full of multimedia equipment and selling their work to multiple employers. In this workshop given by former BusinessWeek personal finance editor Toddi Gutner, now a successful independent writer and media consultant, students will learn the importance and particulars of building their own brand. The discussion will include advice on marketing yourself using social media and networking, pricing your services, structuring your business, and managing your finances and taxes.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Section 1: Friday, Jan. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    (Section 2: Tuesday, Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., with Setty McIntosh and Tim Whitney)
    Intro to Adobe Premiere – Bob Sacha – Room 436 (14 students max)
    There’s a saying that films are made twice: once when they’re written and once when they’re edited. Here at CUNY J-School we’ve focused on teaching Final Cut X as our video editing software because it’s intuitive and gets you thinking about story rather than software. A fair number of news organizations, including The New York Times, use Adobe Premiere Pro as their primary video editing software. In this all day workshop taught by Bob Sacha, CUNY J-School’s Video Storytelling for the Web guru, you’ll get a basic introduction to the software. By the end of this hands-on session, you’ll have imported video and stills, created a basic edit and sound mix, title, and video story from the assets we provide.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Monday, Jan. 13, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Copy Editing – Kate Lurie – Room 434 (25 students max)
    Copy editing in an ever-changing media landscape remains core to good journalism. The platform doesn’t lower the bar for editing standards. Copy editing enforces consistency, accuracy and fairness — something we need now more than ever. In this three-hour workshop, learn how to self-edit, catch grammar, spelling and style mistakes and produce clear, readable copy for publication. Kate Lurie is a digital features editor for The Wall Street Journal and has more than 10 years of professional editing experience. She teaches at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism as an adjunct professor for Craft.

    Monday, Jan. 13, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
    Smart Videos with Smart Phones – Scott Mlyn – Room 434 (25 students max per session)
    Video has quickly become an important tool in journalism, creating opportunities for storytelling now accessible to everyone. If you have a smart phone, you can make high definition videos and instantly publish to a wide audience. We will examine tools and techniques that can improve the quality of your smart phone video. This will include discussion of the fundamentals of video capture such as lighting, exposure, composition, shot selection and audio. Video editing on your smart phone will also be discussed as well as various apps for capture, editing and upload. The workshop will be led by Scott Mlyn, a photo editor, photographer, author, teacher and a director of multimedia projects.  Currently a photo editor at CNBC, for many years he was deputy picture editor of BusinessWeek magazine.  One of his films was shown at the Museum of Modern Art and he has taught photography at the International Center of Photography.

    Tuesday, Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
    Tips, Tricks, and Techniques for Time Management – Tim Harper – Room 308
    If there aren’t enough hours in the day or days in the week to get everything done – finding ideas, preparing pitches, reporting and writing, keeping up on Facebook – here’s a breezy, fast-moving half-day workshop led by CUNY J-School Craft Prof. Tim Harper that aims to help you develop your own individual time management system. The goal is efficiency and productivity: not only getting things done, but getting everything done, and doing it all well. A freelancer writer and editor, Tim Harper has extensive experience from around the globe, including Europe, the Middle East, Central America, and the Far East.

    Section 2: Tuesday, Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Intro to Adobe Premiere – Setty McIntosh and Tim Whitney – Room 436 (14 students max)
    There’s a saying that films are made twice: once when they’re written and once when they’re edited. Here at CUNY J-School we’ve focused on teaching Final Cut X as our video editing software because it’s intuitive and gets you thinking about story rather than software. A fair number of news organizations, including The New York Times, use Adobe Premiere Pro as their primary video editing software. In this all day workshop taught by Setty McIntosh and Tim Whitney, video editors at the CUNY J-School, you’ll get a basic introduction to the software. By the end of this hands-on session, you’ll have imported video and stills, created a basic edit and sound mix, title, and video story from the assets we provide.

    Tuesday, Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    News Photography Workshop for Applicants and CUNY Undergrads – John Smock – Room 438 (20 students max)
    This workshop led by veteran photojournalist John Smock will help you improve your photographic skills for use in all media. We will cover the technical and conceptual aspects of basic camera usage, composition, visual vocabulary, photo editing, lighting, and Photoshop. You will learn how to handle portraits, news conferences, politics, intimate photo essays, and international conflicts. You will also learn how to photograph while recording audio, shooting video, or reporting for print. Whether you are a beginner or intermediate photographer, you will learn the tricks of the trade that professional photojournalists use. Students are encouraged to bring their own cameras, though the School has cameras available for them to use if needed.

    Tuesday, Jan. 14, 1-5 p.m.
    Travel Writing – Tim Harper – Room 308
    One reason most of us got into journalism was to see the world, and tell people about it. CUNY J-School Craft Prof. Tim Harper leads this workshop that aims both to inspire and inform, whether your goal is to become a full-time travel writer or you merely want to supplement your day job with stories you do while on vacation. The sessions will cover everything from how to find and pitch travel stories to what you can write off on your taxes when you get home, with an emphasis on what travel editors are buying now. Tim has a broad range of travel writing experience – books, magazine articles, newspaper stories and online – with datelines from China, the Middle East, Central America and across Europe and the U.S. One session will include a pitch slam, so bring your own ideas for travel stories. A freelancer writer and editor, Tim Harper has extensive experience from around the globe, including Europe, the Middle East, Central America, and the Far East.

    Section 2: Tuesday, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 15, 2:30-5:30 p.m.
    Voice Coaching Workshop – Michael Lysak – Room 330 (15 students max per section)

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Wednesday, Jan. 15, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Intro to Photoshop – John Smock – Room 436 (20 students max)

    Section 2: Wednesday, Jan. 15, Thursday, Jan. 16, and Thursday, Jan. 23 with James Estrin, 9:30-5:30 p.m.
    News Photography – James Estrin – Room 442 (20 students max per section)
    This workshop led by New York Times senior staff photographer and Lens Blog editor James Estrin will help you improve your photographic skills for use in all media. We will cover the technical and conceptual aspects of basic camera usage, composition, visual vocabulary, photo editing, lighting, and Photoshop. The workshop will concentrate on practical tools and problem solving. We will learn how to handle portraits, news conferences, politics, intimate photo essays, and international conflicts. We will also learn how to photograph while recording audio, shooting video,or reporting for print. An afternoon session will concentrate on producing audio slide shows and cross-platform storytelling. Whether you are a beginner or intermediate photographer, you will learn the tricks of the trade that professional photojournalists use. There will be assignments between Days 2 and 3. Students interested in taking the Photojournalism course in the spring are strongly encouraged to sign up for this workshop.

    Wednesday, Jan. 15, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    New Forms of Long Form – Tim Harper – Room 434 (25 students max)
    This informal, discussion-heavy workshop will review traditional long form – including how to pitch a magazine story or do a book proposal – and move on to look at the way narrative nonfiction is being redefined in terms of reporting, structure, style, and of course, technology. We’ll look at how and why some narratives always work, and how the tried and true structures are being adapted today. We’ll talk about the investments, both time and money, that make up the long-form market for readers, publishers, and writers. If there’s a piece of writing you’d like to discuss, send it in advance to the workshop leader, CUNY J-School Craft professor and writing coach Tim Harper, an editorial/publishing consultant who has done a dozen books of his own and helped dozens of other individuals and institutions produce their manuscripts and get them published.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2-5 p.m.
    The Business of Freelancing – Tim Harper – Room 434 (25 students max)
    If you don’t conduct your freelance career like a business, it’s not. It’s a hobby. Longtime freelancer Tim Harper, a J-School Craft professor and writing coach, offers tips and explanations — and inspiration — on various aspects of running a freelance writing business: marketing yourself and your work, negotiating contracts, record-keeping, taxes (and deductions) and more. He’ll talk about what to do to get the most out every story, including the small piece that goes viral overnight to the big book that will take years.

    Monday-Thursday, Jan. 13-16, 5-8 p.m.
    The Crash Course on Covering Economics, Finance, and Business – Greg David – Room 430 (30 students max)
    Want to know why the Great Recession has so devastated the country? Why China is the world’s economic super power and whether the Euro will survive? Why Wall Street is so hated? Why Apple is the most successful American company? Over these four nights, you’ll get a crash course on the basics of covering economic, financial, and business stories. This class is open to applicants, current students NOT TAKING THE BUSINESS CONCENTRATION, and recent graduates. Some reading in advance of each class will be required. The instructor is Greg David, director of the Business & Economics Reporting Program at the CUNY J-School.

    Thursday, Jan. 16 and Friday, Jan. 17, 1-4 p.m.
    Excel for Journalists – Benjamin Lesser – Room 436 (14 students max)
    You’ll learn how to work in a spreadsheet to add context and depth to an existing story or find a new stories to pursue. You’ll learn how to import data in Excel and how to analyze it. Among the concepts you’ll learn include how to sort data, apply formulas, and create a chart. I’ll also provide list of the most useful and easy to access data sets for future reference. Many computer-assisted reporting stories can be done using just Excel. This class will give you the tools necessary to start doing those stories. Ben Lesser has more than a dozen years of municipal and investigative reporting experience at newspapers such as the New York Daily News and The Bergen Record. He was also an adjunct at the CUNY J-School who taught investigative reporting and computer-assisted reporting.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Friday, Jan. 17, 10 a.m-1 p.m.
    Writing the Service Piece – Holly St. Lifer – Room 434 (25 students max)
    According to the National Directory of Magazines’ latest 2011 count, there are 7, 179 U.S. consumer magazines–and there are even more opportunities on the web. The service, or “how-to,” article is one of the most popular magazine and digital formats, offering practical information, resources, and expert advice on life and living. Learn how to translate topics in the news, scientific research, and your own experiences into articles useful to readers. Find out which publications are most freelancer-friendly and how to write pitches that editors can’t turn down. Discover how to write the service article itself, including lean, dynamic copy and catchy headlines and slugs. Although the focus will be on jump-starting a freelance career in print and digital media, this course will also touch briefly on TV, radio and mobile service formats. Learn from a former television producer (VH1, USA, ESPN) turned journalist who currently writes regularly for over 20 publications including Self, Shape, Weight Watchers, Runner’s World, Psychology Today, Ladies’ Home Journal, Huffington Post, More, and AARP.com. Please come to the class with three story ideas.

    Friday, Jan. 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Food Writing – Indrani Sen – Room 442 (25 students max)
    Writing about food must be as simple as eating and cooking it, right? Wrong. Food writing requires more than a fine-tuned palate and a good recipe for holiday cookies. Locavores, the Farm Bill, food safety scares, commodity prices, environmental justice – in this post-Michael Pollan era, food writing is increasingly complex. The good news is it’s also a growing field. Gourmet magazine is gone, but the fertile landscape of localized or specialized food websites, blogs and food zines is still expanding, and general interest publications have increased their food coverage. CUNY J-School Craft professor Indrani Sen leads this day-long workshop that will introduce students to the fundamentals of food writing. Sen is a former Newsday reporter who has written for The New York Times dining section and Saveur magazine, among other publications.

    Friday, Jan. 17, 2-4 p.m.
    Using Social Media for Background and Storytelling – Jennifer Preston and Barbara Gray — Room 430 (25 students max)
    This workshop is led by Jennifer Preston @JenniferPreston, the first social media editor for The New York Times and currently staff writer on the The Lede Blog, and Barbara Gray @barbgray, CUNY J-School Research Lecturer. Preston will cover the elements and ethics of using user-generated content for breaking news and multimedia narrative storytelling. Gray will discuss how to do research and get background for your stories and find people using the latest social media resources.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Tuesday, Jan. 21 and Wednesday, Jan. 22, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Portrait Photography and Post-Production Photo Editing – Jennifer S. Altman –Room 438 (10-15 students max)
    In Part 1 of this two-session class led by veteran freelance photojournalist Jennifer S. Altman, we will cover a brief history of portraiture through various photographic genres and discuss the elements of basic portrait techniques. Students will be introduced to lighting equipment through strobes or flashes and continuous light sources and learn the how to use stands, backdrops, reflectors, gels, and essential accessories. We will address location scouting and how different lighting techniques are applied in practice. We will learn tips and tricks of professionals, such as making the subject feel comfortable and solving lighting problems. Participants will photograph each other. Part 2 is devoted to post-production photo editing skills. Participants will identify and retouch up to three selected images with supervision from the instructors. The workshop will conclude with presentation and critique of participant work. Students can bring their own cameras or check out gear from the school equipment room. They must have their own computers with Adobe Photoshop and a sorting system (such as iPhoto, Lightroom or Photo Mechanic) to do hands-on editing. This will be a valuable and insightful experience for an amateur to a more advanced level of photographer.

    Tuesday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Politics, Power, & Money – Tom Robbins – Room 430 (30 students max)
    The CUNY J-School’s investigative journalist in residence, Tom Robbins, explains how to use public databases to analyze the impact of campaign donors and lobbyists on local elected officials. Robbins has been a columnist and staff writer at the Village Voice, The New York Daily News, and The New York Observer. His stories on political corruption and urban issues have been cited by many organizations, including Investigative Reporters and Editors, the New York Press Club, the Deadline Club, and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, which gave his political columns in the Voice its top award in both 2009 and 2010.

    Section 2: Tuesday, Jan. 21 and Wednesday, Jan. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Video Storytelling Intensive – Almudena Toral – Room 436 (14 students max)
    Web video is hot: Video accounts for 50% of all Internet traffic and mobile video is set to explode. When you think of how easy it is to watch video on a smart phone or how beautiful video looks on an iPad, it’s no wonder that everyone wants more visual content on their screens. As a multiplatform journalist, it helps your job prospects if you know how to tell a story in more than one medium. This two-day workshop concentrates on video storytelling for the web, focusing on non-narrated stories of compelling characters and short, sharply focused pieces targeted for online viewing. We’ll talk about what type of stories work best for web video, finding strong characters, structuring stories, how to film and conduct an interview for a non-narrated piece, how to capture compelling visual sequences and finally, how to assemble a short video using Final Cut Pro X. The mantra for the class will be “Show, don’t Tell!” This advanced class will be hands on, so you’ll need to be up to speed with FCP X and the JVC HM100U HD video camera. You can see Almudena Toral’s work here.

    Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2-5 p.m.
    Sound Science – Mia Lobel – Room 434 (25 students max)
    In this hands-on audio workshop, you’ll learn to take a complex scientific idea or story, break it down into character, plot, and setting, and develop it into an engaging narrative for a wide audience. We’ll discuss how to find and talk to scientists, how to get them to talk to you in a language everyone can understand, and how to make science sing. Plus, you’ll learn how to fact-check science stories for accuracy and balance. Students will workshop and pitch their ideas in class. The “winning” pitch may be produced for Audiofiles. The class will be taught by freelance producer Mia Lobel, who is an adjunct instructor at the CUNY J-School.

    Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2-5 p.m.
    Constant Culture: Reporting the Arts for Radio, David Krasnow – Room 430 (20 students max)
    Join veteran editor and radio producer David Krasnow as he dissects the experience of making a story, from pitch to broadcast, at public radio’s weekly national arts and culture program “Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen.” Students will learn what makes great arts reporting. Bonus: Bring that story idea you’ve been tossing around and if you’re brave enough to pitch to the crowd, David will give you his two cents. Krasnow is the senior editor of “Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen.” Formerly the reviews editor of Artforum, he has contributed to The Village Voice, Jazz Times, Metropolis, The New York Observer, The Wire, and Bomb.

    Section 2: Friday, Jan. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Making Videos with DSLR Cameras – Almudena Toral – Room 436 (15 students max)
    Many newsrooms around the country are now striving to have videos with very high aesthetic and cinematic qualities. Come learn how to shoot video with DSLR cameras in this one-day crash course. The workshop concentrates on video storytelling for the web, focusing on learning the technical aspects of both the camera (Canon 60D) and the audio (Marantz, microphones) components. You can see Class of 2010 grad Almudena Toral’s work here.

    Friday, Jan. 24, 2-5 p.m.
    The Art of Grant Writing – Lisa Armstrong – Room 330
    One way to help finance a freelance journalism career is to master the art of getting grants. In this three-hour workshop, learn how to find grants, fellowships, and other funding for your reporting projects. Lisa Armstrong has reported from several countries, including Liberia, Kenya, and India, and has written for The Washington Post; O, The Oprah Magazine; USA Weekend, and other publications. She has received grants and fellowships from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, The Dart Center and NYU.

    REQUIRED COURSES:

    Section 1: Tuesday, Jan. 21 and Wednesday, Jan. 22, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    (Section 2: Thursday, Jan. 23 and Friday, Jan. 24, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.)
    Required ProTools ProTools Workshop for Radio News Writing and Reporting Students – Chad Bernhard – Room 332 (14 students per session max)
    The required ProTools workshop is for students enrolled in the Radio News Writing & Reporting course in the Spring semester.This two-day workshop will cover the basics of editing and mixing audio in ProTools. From file organization to outputting a final WAV file, this workshop will help students take their audio for broadcast or interactive projects to the next level. The instructor, Chad Bernhard, senior audio engineer at the CUNY J-School, will discuss the nuts and bolts of creating a seamless journalistic edit as well as the aesthetics of mixing ambient sound to create vivid and compelling mixes.

    Thursday, Jan. 23,  10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Required Multimedia and Interactivity for Craft II Interactive Students – Russell Chun – Room 308
    Multimedia journalism demands that you understand your platform, which means knowing how the web works. During this one-day workshop, students are introduced to the basics of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, which are core languages of the web. The workshop will be project-based. You won’t learn to code, but you’ll come away with a better grasp of how complex multimedia stories are developed, and a greater ease with using online tools, templates, and libraries to build your own interactivity.

    NEW THIS YEAR
    Friday, Jan 24, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
    Required Epidemiology Workshop for Students in the Health & Science Reporting Program – Emily D’Agostino – Room 434
    Coffee is good for you…coffee is bad for you. Have you ever wondered why so many news reports about health issues are confusing, contradictory, and, yes, misleading? One big reason is that many journalists are not educated about medical studies—how to understand them, interpret them, and when necessary, debunk them. This three-hour seminar will introduce students to basic concepts such as statistical significance and correlation vs. causation. Students will learn to assess the strengths and limitations of different kinds of studies, and how to recognize when scientists are overhyping their results. Emily D’Agostino is a Ph.D. student in epidemiology and biostatistics at the CUNY School of Public Health.

    Last updated Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 at 10:59 am