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Graciela Mochkofsky

  1. Dean

Graciela Mochkofsky was appointed dean of the Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism by the CUNY Board of Trustees on June 27, 2022. The third dean since the school opened in 2006, she officially assumed the position on August 1 as the only Latina at the helm of a graduate school of journalism in the U.S.

Mochkofsky joined the Newmark J-School in 2016 to launch the nation’s first bilingual master’s journalism concentration in English and Spanish. Three years later, she added the Center for Community Media (CCM) to her portfolio, serving as executive director to an enterprise that supports hundreds of news outlets covering immigrants and communities of color across the country.

Under Mochkofsky’s leadership, the Newmark J-School trained six cohorts of bilingual journalists who are working in newsrooms across the country. She also hosted five Latino Media Summits, both in person and remotely; conceived and developed separate Latino, Black, and Asian media initiatives; and led a groundbreaking project that helped New York community media receive $25 million in city advertising in the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

All the while, she has continued her journalistic work, as a writer for The Paris Review, The Atlantic, and The New Yorker, where she produces a monthly column on Latinx culture and politics.

A native of Argentina, she is a winner of the 2018 Maria Moors Cabot prize for outstanding reporting across Latin America and the Caribbean.

She was a political correspondent with La Nación in Argentina, has been a columnist and blogger for El País in Spain, and a contributor to publications in Latin America, Europe, and the U.S., including The California Sunday Magazine, The New Yorker online, and The Paris Review blog.

She is the author of six nonfiction books in Spanish, two of them about the relationship between press and political power in her home country. Her forthcoming book, The Prophet of the Andes, about a Peruvian Catholic community that converted to Orthodox Judaism and emigrated to the Jewish settlements in the West Bank, will be published in English by Knopf in August.

Mochkofsky has served as a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, a Cullman fellow at the New York Public Library, a Prins Foundation fellow at the Center for Jewish History, a visiting scholar at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University, and a visiting scholar at the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life at Columbia University.

She has taught undergraduate courses in reporting and writing and investigative and literary journalism in Buenos Aires, and she has lectured at Princeton, the CUNY Graduate Center, NYU’s Institute for the Humanities, and many other universities. Mochkofsky has also served as a juror for the Gabriel García Márquez Foundation Journalism Prize, Latin America’s most important journalism award.

She sits on the boards of Report for America, Radio Ambulante, and the Type Media Center, and is a member of the Advisory Circle of the American Journalism Project.

She earned her bachelor’s in journalism and communications at Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires and has an M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism.

PUBLISHED WORK
Why Lorgia García Peña Was Denied Tenure at Harvard
The State of Spanish-Language Media in the U.S
The California Sunday Magazine: The Faithful 
The New Yorker online: Mexico’s Literary Prankster Goes to War With His Publisher
The Paris Review: The Missing Borges
The New Yorker online: The Vital Importance of Learning To See Latinos in Trump’s America